Linebox was recently featured in the Globe and Mail discussing how we have already cracked into the VR industry.

“In the end there are two kinds of people…those who think VR will change the world, and those who haven’t tried VR.” – JML

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When I was little, my parents would take us to antique markets. While much of my nine-year-old brain was preoccupied with Star Wars, I’d pause at tables featuring boxes filled with old stereoscopic cards from the late-1800s and early-1900s. Since many of the dealers didn’t have the viewer needed to see the images in three dimensions (or perhaps they’d hid the delicate instrument when they saw me coming), I trained myself to cross my eyes until the two images came together and popped out; with my active imagination, these old scenes of city parks, railroads and exotic locales became tiny worlds to inhabit.

The 21st-century world of virtual reality isn’t much different. As futuristic as the headgear may appear and as complex the software producing the images may seem, the end result is two shifted images that, when combined together with lenses (or by crossing one’s eyes), place the viewer in a 3D-world.

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[Daniel Voshart, Linebox. (Dave LeBlanc for the Globe and Mail)]

And architects, educators and students are beginning to spend a lot more time in this brave new world. Since admission can cost as little as lunch-money, this makes sense. At the low end, all that’s needed is a customized cardboard box – Google Cardboard is the popular choice – a smartphone and a downloaded app. For a few 20s, one can purchase a pair of foldout glasses that clip onto one’s cellphone like futuristic pince-nez. For full, vertigo-inducing immersion there are the strap-on goggles that fill your field of vision and drain your wallet of hundreds of dollars.

“You’re going to love it – there’s no learning curve to this,” says Daniel Voshart of Linebox Studio as he hands me the umbilical-corded goggles to slip on. “The only question I get is: ‘Is the mask on properly?’”…. Read more